Persönlicher Status und Werkzeuge

Prof. Dr. Peter Vogl

Professor emeritus since 30.09.2014

Chair

Theoretical Semiconductor Physics

Department

Physics

Contact Details

Business card at TUMonline

Academic Career and Research Areas

Professor Vogl conducts research on theoretical solid state physics. His research focuses primarily on semiconductor materials, quantum information theory, spintronics, quantum transport and laser physics.

Professor Vogl (b. 1949) studied at the University of Graz, received his doctorate in 1974, and acquired his postdoctoral teaching qualification (habilitation) in 1980 after several years spent working as a researcher in the USA (University of Urbana-Champaign in Illinois) and Germany (Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart). He was a visiting researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1986 to 1987 and joined TUM Physics Department as a professor in 1990. Professor Vogl has held the Chair of Theoretical Physics since 1993.

    Awards

    • Fellowship of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (1996)
    • Max-Kade-Preis für Forschung in den USA (1986)
    • Fulbright Stipendium für USA (1977)

    Key Publications

    Andlauer T, Vogl P: "Electrically controllable g tensors in quantum dot molecules". Physical Review B. 2009; 279: 045307.

    Abstract

    Kubis T, Yeh C, Vogl P, Benz A, Fasching G, Deutsch C: "Theory of non-equilibrium quantum transport and energy dissipation in terahertz quantum cascade lasers". Physical Review. 2009; B 79: 195323.

    Abstract

    Birner S, Zibold T, Andlauer T, Kubis T, Sabathil M, Trellakis A, Vogl P: "nextnano: General Purpose 3-D Simulations". IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices. 2007; 54, 2137.

    Abstract

    Mamaluy D, Vasileska D, Sabathil M, Zibold T, Vogl P: "Contact block reduction method for ballistic transport and carrier densities of open nanostructures". Physical Review. 2005; B 71: 245321.

    Abstract

    Vogl P, Hjalmarson HP, Dow JD: "A Semi-empirical Tight-Binding Theory of the Electronic Structure of Semiconductors". J. Phys. Chem. Sol. 1983; 44: 365.